Skip to main content

About your Search

20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
for a number of years mostly brown university, so i really didn't teach the 60's because it wasn't history but later on that became an important part of my courses and then i've written some books which talked about aspects of the 60's and like a lot of other historians i became uncomfortable in the notion that the sixties could be described as something 1960 to 1976 so they like to talk to the 30's or the 20s or the 90's and so forth you can do that because of the power throughout the decade. mostly it doesn't work and here is the 60's i don't think it does either. because if you look back at what was happening in the early 60's, 60, 61, 63, 64, at least until kennedy assassination in november, 1963 and so much of daily life and popular culture and music and politics and so forth and the way people dress and so forth seem very much like the 50's and when we think of the fifties we think of a lot of turmoil, political polarization, urban riots, vietnam, rock concert and woodstock and so on and i became convinced that you really shouldn't talk about the 60's, 1960 to 1970 but something wher
for a number of years, mostly at brown university. as we move through this thing, i started doing this in the 60s, so i didn't teach the 60s because it was in history. later on an important part of my courses and i've written some books which talked about aspects of the 60s. like a lot of other historians, i became a little bit uncomfortable with the notion that the 60s can be described as something 1960 to 1970. historians like to do this. they like to talk about the 30s or or the 20s or the 90s and so forth. sometimes it works. in the 30s you can do that because of depression throughout the decade. mostly it doesn't work because if you look back with in the early 60s, 61, 62, 63, 64 until kennedy's assassination in november 1963, so much a daily life in popular culture and music and politics and the way people dress and so forth seemed very much like the 60s. when we think of the 60s we think of a lot of turmoil, polarization, urban riots rock concerts, woodstock, so forth and so on. and i became convinced that he should not talk about the 60s as 19621970, the something with the
will clearly run for governor and beats pat brown who also beat the knicks and. >> so in effect it comes out of nowhere. progressivism with the turmoil of the night of course, we've no the turmoil of the great depression and obamacare comes out of the great recession. where in the world does the great society come from? and as a kid seven years old i remember 64 we went around the neighborhood to win the war of 1964. it is my awakening. how it is a sense something important happened but one could not predict the revolution and social policy of the great society. the sheer wealth of america, could you talk about that? >> guest: the economy growing nonstop since 1961 and was absolutely powerful. with a steam engine in. i once wrote a book called grand expectations that covers this period. this was the time and johnson was not nothing if not grandiose. not much of a speaker but on top of everything. people contrast did two obama. when you talk about the way johnson managed congress never letting up and on top of things. and wanted to get these things done. with the loud and boisterous texan wit
, and beats pat brown, who four years earlier had beaten nixon in the race for governor. >> host: what i always found most amaze about the great society in effect it comes out of nowhere. there's no predicate for it. we know the new deal comes out of the turmoil of the great depression. you can even argue that obamacare -- we can call it that -- obamacare comes oust the great recession. where in the world does the great society come from? i think you answer that question, and it's -- i was a kid during this period, and seven years old, in 1965, and i remember in '64, we went around the neighborhood, all-black communities, saying, we won the war of 196 4. and this was about the election of lbj. and it was a sense that something important happened. but one could not predict the revolution in social policy that became the great society. and your answer for all that seems to be -- it's the sheer wealth of america. is it -- cue talk about that? >> guest: yes. the economy had been growing nonstop since 1961. and it was absolutely powerful. moving ahead like a steam engine in '64 and '65, and t
is michael peach, and he's the publisher of little brown who is tom wolfe's publisher. if he'll stand, i would hope he could be recognized. mike? there he is. thank you, michael. [applause] >> welcome. >> thank you. and our sponsor, one of the really great sponsors that we've had for many, many years, they've been really huge supporters of the miami book fair, and that's wpbt, channel 2. and to get our program off the ground, i want to bring out the executive vice president and chief operating officer, delaware hour race sukdeo please, please, welcome her. thank you all. >> have a good evening. [applause] >> thank you, everyone, and welcome. my name is delores, i'm the coo for wpbt-2 which is your public television station. [applause] now, what i love about the miami book fair is that for me it represents how we should be known here in miami. sure, we have beautiful beaches, we've got some interesting politics. i think increasingly we'll be known for our wacky characters. but if you look to the person to your right and if you speak to the person to your left, what you will find are engag
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)